Peter Gentenaar: Paper Sculpture

More than 100 of Peter Gentenaar’s ethereal paper sculptures were installed inside the Abbey church of Saint-Riquier in France. Gothic architecture + paper art = SWOON!

I love how the curves and organic forms of the paper sculptures echo the beautiful vaulting and cluster piers of the church interior – look how the sculptures have ribbing just like the ribbed groin vaults! Gothic architecture, facilitated by the invention of the flying buttress, is characterized by the towering, luminous spaces created by the higher ceilings and huger windows that flying buttresses allowed for (compared to the engaged buttresses of Romanesque architecture). So the true lightness and airiness of the suspended paper objects reminds us how the seemingly light and airy walls are actually a monumental stone structure. Just gorgeous, and amazing photos too.

Here is a link to Peter Gentenaar’s site translated into English. Google didn’t do a seamless job in the translation, but here’s some bits from his artist statement that I liked:

My interest in paper dates from the time I worked with it as a graphic artist…. Because I worked from the mind of the sculptor and graphic artist, I stayed as a long paper which printed material or a mold that could be filled. As my technique has improved, I found that I have not dried with a paper had everything I wanted…. A sheet of paper is thin and strong, like a leaf of a plant. When the sheet is reinforced with thin bamboo strips that resemble the veins of the leaf and woordt the agreement between the two even more stressed.
Through my long flax pulp, grease, grinding, arise during the drying enormous tensions between the bamboo is not shrinking and shrinking greatly in drying paper pulp that has changed. These tensions give the sheet a form that is most reminiscent of a opkrullend leaf in autumn.
All my work comes as a 2 dimensional plain wet pulp on my vacuum table, which ultimately shaped by the tension during drying.
The pulp is the bearer of the shape, color and texture, the simplicity and directness with which this
entails makes it a wonderful material.
My paper is made from bleached flax fiber, which Dehollander with lightfast pigments are colored, the paper can be transparent. The molds are sprayed with a flame retardant and sturdy enough sense to be cleaned.

Discovered via Upon a Fold.

PS: I am so glad that I had an excuse to add a “ribbed groin vault” tag to the SFCB blog. My work is complete!

 

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Naomi Bardoff
Naomi Bardoff
In 2010 Naomi Bardoff graduated from Bard College, where she majored in fine arts and studied watercolor, ink drawing, and book-making. She has also taken classes at the Chicago Center for Book and Paper Arts. Since moving to the San Francisco Bay Area, Naomi has been working on her illustration portfolio, working in offices, and volunteering and taking classes at the San Francisco Center for the Book. In addition to the SFCB blog, she blogs on her art blog, naomese - naomi bardoff's art blog; and pins to her Pinterest boards. Her own book work can be found on her website.

4 Trackbacks

  • [...] of Saint-Riquier in France wasn’t beautiful enough already, it was temporarily filled with over 100 intricate and graceful paper flowers. Netherlands-based artist Peter Gentenaar created the sculptures with bamboo ribbing that echoes [...]

  • [...] of Saint-Riquier in France wasn’t beautiful enough already, it was temporarily filled with over 100 intricate and graceful paper flowers. Netherlands-based artist Peter Gentenaar created the sculptures with bamboo ribbing that echoes [...]

  • By Friday Props #5 » The Edgeworks Blog on June 22, 2012 at 2:46 pm

    [...] graceful and stunningly beautiful paper flowers fill the Gothic Abbey of Sanit-Riquier in France. These flowers are the creation of artist  Peter Gentenaar of the Netherlands. Handing out Props for the [...]

  • […] Here it is 2014 – a new year, a new beginning, so it only makes sense that I would choose a photo that speaks to my heart and inspires. Photo source […]

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